CMBA Spring Blogathon…

source: MGM

Well, well, well…..it feels good to be back!

If you all recall, back in early 2020 I took a brief hiatus from writing here on AGAM to focus on other writing gigs I had at the time. But, due to my love of classic films (plus my bone to pick with Comcast for putting TCM with sports for some reason,) I’ve decided to brush off my boots and continue sharing my love and knowledge of classic films with you all!

What better way to kick start my return to writing than with another wonderful CMBA blogathon.

Due to the spread of COVID-19 and the immediate shutdown of the large swaths of the country, many people are stuck inside their homes for extended periods of time.

A lot people will use TV and movies as a way to escape their woes, sort of like comfort food.

source: Woman’s Day

In fact, at least in my head, there are certain classic films that you can equate to comfort food as well.

So, for this blogathon I’ll be counting down my top five favorite ‘Classics for Comfort,’ in no particular order.


Number 5: High Society 1956

source: MGM

Ahhh, yes. What better way to comfort your soul then with a quintessential MGM movie musical.

High Society has always been one of my favorite films. It holds a special place in my heart because it was the last movie Grace Kelly filmed before she left Hollywood and moved to Monaco to take on a new role of mother and princess.

I also really enjoyed the smooth jazz sounds of Louis Armstrong and his band that permeated throughout the film. Another great thing about this movie are the performances from the leads: Bing Crosby, Grace Kelly, and last but never least Frank Sinatra.

The chemistry between the three was splendid and provided an abundance of laughs as the movie progressed.

I never get tired of this film, and it is absolutely the perfect way to spend an afternoon.


Number 4: Sunday In New York 1963

source: MGM

Sunday in New York is a cute movie. It stars a fairly young Jane Fonda and a very handsome Rod Taylor in what is essentially the battle of the sexes.

Fonda plays a young professional who broke up with her boyfriend after he pressured her to go all the way before she was ready. To keep it short, she runs into Rod Taylor’s character on a bus and by the end of the movie’s many, many, many twists and turns they end up falling in love.

One, we need to look at this withtin the context of the 1960s.

This era, wasn’t the best for women to say the least so it’s very possible that making light of a topic such a pressuring a woman to have relations before she’s ready wouldn’t sit well with a lot of people.

Quite frankly, even I did some soul searching before putting this film on the list because I wasn’t quite sure if it was appropriate. But, I came to the conclusion you have to view it through the lenses of history and take it for what it is: a romantic comedy with 1960s ideals and a trends that wouldn’t be right now in 2020.

That being said, the film does give us gorgeous shots of New York City in the 1960s and I might say Rod Taylor is very funny in the movie as well.

So all in all, I really enjoy the film and it’s, ironically, become one of my go-to’s on Sunday evenings – it’s fitting, haha.


Number 3: Ocean’s 11 1960

source: Warner Bros

Glitz! Glamour! Vegas!

1960s Oceans’s 11 is one of my favorite films of all time. I mean, what more can you ask for? Frank Sinatra, Sammy Davis Jr, Dean Martin and the rest of the Rat Pack planning a major heist under the sparkling lights of Las Vegas.

The movie looks beautiful. The way director Lewis Milestone shot the film immediately immerses you into a time where Vegas was the number one entertainment spot in the country.

Couple that with the soundtrack the movie provides us with, including my favorite sung by Dean Martin, and Ocean’s 11 will leave you feeling with a great sense of nostlagia.


Number 2: Funny Face 1957

source: Paramount Pictures

“Bonjour, Paris!”

Funny Face made me want to travel to Paris, become an author, and find love while I’m there. It’s not just a movie musical, it’s an experience. From the music, to the dancing, the plot, the wonderful array of color schemes that we see in the film, it’s an absolute treat to watch.

Audrey Hepburn’s on screen chemistry with Fred Astaire is one for the history books. The way they went from strangers, to friends, to lovers all under the lights, sounds and smells of the City of Love, is enough to make anyone swoon.


Number 1: Seven Brides for Seven Brothers 1954

source: MGM

Last but not least, we have Seven Brides for Seven Brothers from 1954.

Where do I begin?

This is the first classic film I bought on DVD, if that tells you anything; I have a serious affinity for this movie. MGM movie musicals are basically chicken soup for the soul: the plot isn’t complicated, you know what’s going to happen and the songs are out of this world.

Seven Brides for Seven Brothers is no different.

Starring Howard Keel and Jane Powell, the film tells the story of the Pontipee brothers in 1850s Oregon territory looking for, well, wives.

Stanley Donen, masterfully crafted this in a way where watching it is not only easy on the eyes, but you’re in awe of how the way the scenes were filmed.

Take this scene for example:

The choreography is extraordinarily difficult! The actors pulled it off seamlessly, but without the eye catching direction of Donen it wouldn’t have looked the same.

I really do love this film, I have it on DVD so whenever I’m feeling down or stressed I pop it into my DVD player and let my mind relax a bit.


All of these films hold a special place in my heart and they truly do make me feel warm when I’m going through a particularly rough time.

For all of you stuck inside due to COVID-19, I hope that my list could cheer you up a bit! I really mean it! ❤

Come say “Hi” to me on twitter! Here!

If you would like to read the other submissions in this blogathon, click: here.

Classic Film Reviews: Funny Face 1957

source: Paramount Pictures

Paris has always been a city I’ve dying to visit for a long time; the art, the culture and the food would all make a trip to the French capitol worth while.

In 1957’s Funny Face starring Audrey Hepburn and Fred Astaire, Hepburn’s character Jo Stockton goes through a similar love affair with Paris as well.

Being plucked out of obscurity by fashion magazine editor Maggie Prescott, played by Kay Francis, in order to usher in a new era of “intelligent and beautiful,” Jo goes on a whirlwind makeover that see her go from mousy librarian, to high fashion cover model.

source: Paramount Pictures

While undergoing her transformation she meets and slowly but surely falls in love with photographer Dick Avery, played by Fred Astaire.

Initially she treats him like any other woman would a man who made unwanted advances, but when Dick subverts her expectations she gradually lets her heart get carried away.

Luckily for Jo, Dick appeases her every whim and desire, even going as far as going to underground clubs to discuss the inner workings of the human psyche with philosophers.

source: Paramount Pictures

Slowly but surely, Dick and Jo start to fall in love, and this coincides with Jo’s professional modeling career taking off.

Hell, there’s even a huge musical number celebrating their love for Paris in “Bonjour Paris!”

But, as always in typical Hollywood fashion….something goes a’muck. Jo and Dick get into an argument over something pretty trivial ( another man, what else is new) which causes the budding new relationship to strain.

source: Paramount Pictures

As Jo and Dick continue to fight, Dick makes plans to leave the country due to Jo’s extracurricular escapades. Eventually Jo makes a complete 180 but not until Dick takes a taxi to the airport.

At his terminal, he runs into the man that Jo was with and he learns that Jo attacked him refused his advances and that’s when the light bulb goes of in Dick’s head.

Dick makes his way back to the year end fashion show where Jo is supposed to be wearing her statement piece. But according to Maggie, it’s revealed that Jo ran back to the place where they shared their first romantic moment: a church where Dick first photographed her in a wedding dress.

They inevitably make up while serenading each other with “S’Wonderful” thus erasing any bad blood between them.

source: Paramount Pictures

Funny Face is absolutely an incredible movie. It’s visuals, acting and on location shooting makes for a wickedly entertaining ride.

Stanley Donen most definitely had the magic touch when it came to movie making. The film is every pre convieved notion you had about Paris and more.

The Bohemian intellectuals, the fashion, the art, and the food, all the while you fall in love with the person of your dreams.

What’s not to like?

If you get a chance be sure to give this flick another spin, you’ll probably catch some things you missed the first time!

*****Author’s note*****

I apologize for being MIA for a month and a half. School has been quite stressful and my job at the school’s newspaper has given me extra ‘food’ on my plate.

Since my time is starting to free up, I’ll be able to post a lot more regularly. This means more intriguting behind the scenes stores I can bring you all!

Thanks again!

  • Alex

Summer Under The Stars Blogathon…

Ava and Lena were surprisingly very good friends.

In Hollywood, it isn’t uncommon to find friendships that pleasantly surprise you.

One of these close duos happen to be the unlikely paring of Ava Gardner and Lena Horne.

Much has been heard about these two, and we all know about that infamous “battle” for a coveted role in Showboat. But, if you were to go behind the scenes and take a deep dive into these two women, you’ll see that they were quite possible the closest pair of friends you’d ever meet.

Showboat 1951

As part of the Summer Under the Stars lineup, TCM has dedicated two separate days for both Lena Horne and Ava Gardner. Airing on the 6th and 8th respectively, Gardner and Horne have much more in common that most people would be led to believe.

After movie shoots, Ava and Lena would go to each other’s apartments, drink, laugh, and tell stories of sleazy co-stars that tried to hit on them.

Ava would tell Lena how difficult it was up-holding the status of being a sex symbol and Lena would open up about the struggles of being a light skin black actress in a notoriously prejudiced Hollywood.

There were even times where Lena, being the brilliant singer that she was, would help Ava sing her way through her own recordings in order to help her prepare for the role of Julie LaVerne in Showboat.

Ava Gardner, Stevie Wonder and Lena Horne

Both of these women have incredible bodies of work and I urge you all to check out at least a couple of their films. They both persevered and fought through the crazy system that was the Hollywood golden age.

It’s only fitting that they were best friends.

The Blistering on-screen Romance of Clark Gable and Joan Crawford

source: MGM

If you know anything about classic Hollywood, then you know that on set romances are as common as chain smoking.

People made up, broke up and repeated the process all over again.

In the case of Joan Crawford and Clark Gable, they did all of things – and then some.

Perhaps the most infamous couple is Hollywood history (besides Brad and Angelina) Joan and Clark had a long history of lust filled glances, late night phone conversations, and on set dalliances.

It first started all the way back in 1931 with Dance, Fools, Dance. Crawford‘s star was quickly rising in Hollywood and Gable was struggling to find his footing on the silver screen. It wasn’t until Crawford specifically chose Gable to star alongside her that his career really started to kick into gear.

it was like an electric current went through my body…my knees buckled…if he hadn’t held me by the shoulders, I’d have dropped.”

Crawford on meeting Gable for the first time

The production of this movie went pretty swiftly, and after filming ended, Crawford wanted to work with Gable again.

The next project they worked on was 1931’s Laughing Sinners. It wasn’t a memorable film, but Gable and Crawford continued to get to know one another. I will say that it is an enjoyable film and I hope I get to watch it again someday.

For all the flirtatious looks they had on set with this movie, it doesn’t compare to the blazing fire that they sent into overdrive on their next movie, Possessed.

source: MGM

This is where Hollywood lore was made.

By this point, Gable‘s star was rising and he was a hot commodity. Crawford was a bonafide star, at this point she was dubbed the ‘Queen of Hollywood.’

So, what happens when you combine a handsome young actor with one of Hollywood’s biggest stars?

Well…, let’s just say that many things were exchanged between the two, in more ways than one.

Here’s a quote from Crawford on how she felt about Gable during this time:

“In the picture, we were madly in love. When the scenes ended, the emotion didn’t–we were each playing characters very close to our own.”

Joan Crawford, from Clark Gable by Chrystopher J. Spicer

While filming Possessed their affair become public knowledge, and naturally the MGM studio higher ups weren’t too pleased with this. Gable and Joan‘s affair nearly turned Hollywood on its head

It got to the point where Louis B Mayer requested that the two stop their romance. Of course, they didn’t comply and Mayer then threatened to destroy their careers.

Eventually they did separate after enough pressing from studio heads, but they didn’t quit seeing each other.

According to some sources, they continued to fool around even while they were married to other people.

Not my cup of tea, but I digress.

In the end, the couple never stopped loving each other, and it shows when Joan talked about him after Gable‘s death.

“Lovemaking never felt with anyone like what it did with Clark.”

Joan Crawford, from Joan Crawford: The Essential Biography by Lawrence J. Quirk & William Schoell

If that isn’t love, then I don’t know what it.

Behind the Camera: Maureen O’Hara

Maureen was probably one of Hollywood’s great beauties

When discussing classic Hollywood cinema, there are usually several different actors and actresses that come to mind as you murmur the words, “golden age.”

Greta GarboFred AstaireHumphrey BogartBette DavisJames Dean, and Audrey Hepburn, are just a couple of many names on the endless list of legendary classic movie performers.

A woman that doesn’t nearly get enough recognition on these lists is Ireland’s very own ‘Queen of Technicolor’, Maureen O’Hara. 


Born on August 17th, 1920 in Ranelagh, Ireland, O’Hara‘s career lasted 61 years, triumphantly ending in 1991 with the romantic-comedy Only the Lonely starring alongside John Candy. During those six decades, she co-starred with some of the most admired actors in film history.

From Tyrone Power to John Wayne and even Charles LaughtonMaureen O’Hara’s film roles were just an extension of who she was as a woman. 

Whether it be sword fighting with Errol Flynn, planning a summer vacation with Jimmy Stewart, or falling madly in love with John Wayne on the mountainous terrain of rural Ireland, Maureen O’Hara’s filmography is perhaps one of the most underappreciated in classic Hollywood history.

Humble Beginnings

source: Republic Pictures

Strikingly beautiful and blessed with an aura that the camera naturally gravitated too, O’Hara was raised in the sleepy Dublin neighborhood of Ranelagh.

Born to Charlie and Marguerite (née Lilburn) FitzSimonsMaureen has said that her adolescence was “the most remarkable and eccentric that she could’ve hoped for.”

Being the second oldest of six children (and the only red-head), O’Hara lived a relatively happy and carefree childhood. She would often describe her mother in a kind light, saying that she,”inherited [her] singing voice from [her] and that when her mother would leave the house, men would “leave their houses just to catch a glimpse of her on the street.”

O’Hara has also asserted in interviews that she was a rather “blunt child”, saying that she “didn’t take discipline very well.”

As an infant, she was given the nickname, “Baby Elephant” for having a stout physique. Her tomboyish nature had her take part in a number of physically strenuous activities like fishing, riding horses, judo and even Gaelic Football.

O’Hara with her mother, Marguerite FitzSimons in 1948

At the age of 5, she began dancing. O’Hara didn’t take the hobby seriously until a gypsy spotted her and prophesied that she would one day become well-known for her acting skills.

She initially scoffed at the idea, but her parents coaxed her into the thought. Her hunger quickly for fame quickly grew and by age 10 she was working for the Rathmines Theater Company, where she honed her skills in amateur theater productions.

It wasn’t until the age of 17 when O’Hara grew into her stunning looks that casting agents started giving her attention.

By 1937, O’Hara was a full-time actress, working at the Abbey Theatre where she swiftly caught the attention of singer/actor Harry Richman. Richman insisted that O’Hara should travel to London to have a screen test done.

She agreed, and when Maureen and her parents landed on the island she was immediately thrust into the limelight, making her screen debut in the 1938 film Kicking the Moon Around.

First Films

source: Kino International, Ltd 

Although O’Hara didn’t consider Kicking the Moon Around her screen debut, it’s still counted as the first film she’s starred in. However, the movie that she truly believed to be her screen debut was the Hitchcock thriller Jamaica Inn.

Co-starring alongside Charles Laughton, Jamaica Inn is a Hitchcock film through and through. Although it isn’t as recognizable as some of his later drama/thrillers, it holds it’s own as a standalone film.

O’Hara‘s performance received raved reviews, quickly cementing her place amongst Hollywood elite. She was then offered a seven-year contract off the back of her stand out performance.

At first, she and her family declined, citing that O’Hara was far too young to make such a momentous jump in her career. But, after a few drinks and coddling, they caved and Maureen signed a seven-year contract to Mayflower Pictures.

After that she was cast in The Hunchback of Notre Dame in 1939. Boarding the ship liner from England to New York, then taking a train from NYC to Los Angeles, O’Hara‘s Hollywood journey truly began.

Because of her role in The Hunchback of Notre Dame, O’Hara‘s star in Hollywood continued to rise, starring in a number of films like How Green Was My Valley, Miracle on 34th Street and of course The Quiet Man.

She followed those up by starring in a series of John Ford films that, just maybe, cemented her legacy as “Hollywood’s toughest broad.

Later Years

As O’Hara got older, she continued to act and hold her own against some of the best in the business, even acting up until the early 1990s. Stand outs from that era include, The Parent Trap, Spencer’s Mountain, and the very funny Mr. Hobbs Takes a Vacation.

Unfortunately, after a very long life, Maureen O’ Hara would pass away on October 24th, 2015, leaving behind not only a fantastic filmography, but also and incredible legacy as a human being.

My Obsession with…Linda Darnell

Linda Darnell 1
source: Life Magazine

I was recently listening to a You Must Remember This episode on Linda Darnell and I felt compelled to write something about it.

Linda Darnell was, perhaps, one of the most underrated actresses of her time. With her acting ability often downplayed, she managed to prove her doubters wrong, staring in films like Unfaithfully Yours, Anna and the King of Siam, and most famously, A Letter to Three Wives.

Unfortunately, her career would be plagued with personal conflicts, bad management, and poorly time marriages, eventually culminating with her tragic death on April 10 of 1965.

So, let’s take a trip back to the early 1950s and revisit the woefully overlooked career of, Linda Darnell.


Born Monetta Eloyse Darnell in Dallas, Texas on October, 16th 1923, ‘Linda’ as she would later be called by her Hollywood cohorts, she was pushed into show business at a young age.

Being thrust into the limelight by her mother, Pearl, Linda has more or less been groomed for stardom, becoming a model at 11 and a full-fledged actress at 13.

By 1937, Linda was scouted by a talent agent from 20th Century Fox. She and her family went to Hollywood to do some screen tests, but eventually, Mr. Zanuck caught wind of Darnell‘s actual age and sent her back to Texas.

Heartbroken yet determined, Linda honed her craft and continued acting locally, inevitably returning to Hollywood with a new attitude.

She appeared in several smaller films before landing her big break with 1940’s Brigham Young, co-starring alongside her frequent leading man, Tyrone Power. In the summer of that same year, Darnell worked on The Mark of Zorro where, once again, she worked with Power.

The film managed to be successful and further plunged Darnell into the spotlight. But, unfortunately after that ‘Zorro‘, the studio system didn’t allow her to go after the roles she craved, so, she was relegated to B films that typecasted her.

Luckily, she would bounce back with the wonderful Blood and Sand also starring alongside Power. According to Darnell herself, however, her career would take a sharp downturn after this.

“People got tired of seeing the sweet young things I was playing and I landed at the bottom of the roller coaster. The change and realization were very subtle. I’d had the fame and money every girl dreams about—and the romance. I’d crammed thirty years into ten, and while it was exciting and I would do it over again, I still know I missed out on my girlhood, the fun, little things that now seem important.”


Davis, Ronald L., Hollywood Beauty: Linda Darnell and the American Dream.

Several years, and subpar movies later, Darnell’s career would stall because she refused Daryl Zanuck‘s advances. Pulling herself up by her chinstraps and not letting this get to her, she focused on the war effort, raising money, and performing regularly at the Hollywood Canteen.

After that, Zanuck often overlooked her for many film roles, and her star started declining. Instead, she was cast in roles that didn’t fit her and slowly resented show business.

For the rest of her career, she starred in B-movies, forgettable blockbuster and the occasional hit, like A Letter to Three Wives and Unfaithfully Yours.


The unfortunate thing about Linda Darnell is that she never really had the chance to let her career flourish. Between her rushed childhood and her underwhelming adult career, Darnell never got the chance to settle into her acting.

It’s tragic, really.

Darnell wasn’t only absolutely gorgeous and wickedly talented, she also was quite the lady. Raised with southern charms and a witty personality, Linda Darnell will, hopefully, be remembered alongside other Hollywood greats of the era.

Thank You for 100 Followers, from AGAM!

tumblr_p2r46qhcdg1qk2y5po6_500
gif source: Doses of Grace Tumblr

Well, well, well….how time flies.

About a year ago, I started this blog. I wasn’t really expecting much to be honest with you. AGAM was more of a place to vent some inner thoughts I had about most of the classic films I’ve seen. Never have I imagined that it would grow to be this big. Even though 100 followers doesn’t seem like much, I very much appreciate the time all of you take to read through my writing.

So, I’m thanking you for all of this. The ups and the downs, and everything in between.

Here’s to 100 more!

Classic Film Reviews: Indiscreet (1958)

Indiscreet 1958
source: Warner Bros

Ingrid Bergman and Cary Grant are a pair to be reckoned with.

From Notorious to the duo’s incredible friendship, Bergman and Grant have always been two of classic Hollywood’s greats.

So, when I viewed the film, Indiscreet, I was in absolute heaven.

It may very well be a simple romantic comedy, but, I believe there’s more to it.


At this point in Bergman‘s career, she was essentially blacklisted from Hollywood.

From being denounced by the Catholic Church for her affair with Roberto Rossellini, to having the majority of her foreign films flop at the box office, Bergman was treading on thin ice.

In walks her good friend Cary Grant.

Indiscreet1958 2
source: Warner Bros

Friends for decades, co-workers for several movies, and close confidants, Grant has always stood by her side, even accepting her Oscar Award for Anastasia in 1956 when she couldn’t attend.

In a way, Indiscreet makes for perfect a movie. The film has two very likable leads, and the plot has quite an acquired taste. Think of Indiscreet as an Americano, something you only drink when you’re desperate for coffee, except it’s sweeter and has a richer taste.

Directed by my favorite filmmaker, Stanley Donen, the movie tells the story of Anna Kalman, played by Ingrid Bergman, a London based actress who has given up on finding love.

Through her brother in law, played by Cecil Parker, she meets Phillip Adams, played by Grant, an economist with a taste for the theatre.

Anna and Phillip eventually start dating, and everything appears to go well until Phillip reveals his secret.

All the while the couple were in their “honeymoon” stage of their relationship Phillip conveniently forgot to tell Anna that he actually wasn’t a married man.  Anna believed that she was having an affair, so when Phillip told her the news, she didn’t take it too well.

Indiscreet1958 3
source: Warner Bros

The rest of the film sees Anna attempt to get back to Phillip, which she does with much hilarity and fanfare, inevitably deciding to get married in the end.


The movie isn’t too well known in the classic movie sphere, but that doesn’t mean it doesn’t mean it fails to make a lasting impression. The coupling of Grant and Bergman not only made for a truly entertaining movie, it made sense.

If you were to look at the script and synopsis of the movie, it does have rather mature themes. I don’t think there could be another duo, besides Grant and Bergman, that could’ve taken these roles.

Donen did an incredible job with not only the script, but, the direction as well. The feel, mood, pacing and acting in this film, gives you a sense of real richness. Meaning, that it feels mature, this isn’t your typical classic Hollywood romance – it’s a romance for the older generation.

I suppose that’s what makes it so special.

Salvador Dali Questions Our Sanity in Alfred Hitchcock’s Spellbound (1945)

Dali Hitch
source: United Artists

When we think of Alfred Hitchcock, there are certain qualities and buzzwords that are synonymous with his name: brilliant, genius, crazy and a multitude of others.

What happens when you pair a crazy, pedantic genius, with a hairbrained painter with a mustache? A wildly fascinating dream sequence in 1945’s Spellbound.


In 1945, the acting talents of Ingrid Bergman and Gregory Peck joined forces with director Alfred Hitchcock to create a rather underrated movie in Hitchcock‘s filmography.

Spellbound is a peach of a movie, combining romance and psychology with the intrigue of forgotten memory.

Bergman and Peck play psychoanalysts Constance Peterson and Anthony Edwardes, respectively.

In classic Hollywood fashion, the pair ends up breaking every professional rule in the book and inevitably have an affair.

Naturally, when you fall in bed love with someone, especially as quickly and passionately as having an affair, you enter a “honeymoon phase” where you notice every single tiny detail of your object of affection.

spellbound 2
source: United Artists

This is where Constance picks up on Anthony’s strange habits. She finds out that not only does he have a fear of parallel lines on white backgrounds, he’s also not who he claims he is. Constance deduces that he might be an imposter, based on a number of things that Anthony has told her.

From killing the real Dr. Edwardes, having bouts of amnesia, to having a guilt complex, Constance overlooks these GLARING issue to get this poor man (one she doesn’t know very well, mind you) the help he needs.

When Edwardes sneaks away from Constance’s grasp, due to fear of, well, everything – she tracks him down and attempts to use her psychoanalytic techniques on him. These methods prove to be unsuccessful, and eventually, she takes him to upstate New York, where they meet two doctors who proceed to psychoanalyze his many stray thoughts.

DALI-SPELLBOUND2
source: United Artists

In steps Salvador Dali.

In 1945, Dail moved specifically to Hollywood to work on this film. Hitchcock wanted a scene that portrays the surrealness of Edwardes’ dreams and Dali was the only artist to bring Hitch‘s madcap imagination to life.

In order to capture this, accurately and as demented as possible, Hitchcock gave Dali free reign to shape, and mold this world to his liking. This is how we get a rather, disturbing, and incredibly unsettling dream scene smack dab in the middle of the film.

Dali and Hitchcock wanted us to feel that way, they wanted us to squirm in our seats and crane our necks away from the television (or movie screen in this case.) This 3-minute sequence, unfortunately, is probably the most memorable part of the film, however, it’s almost certainly the most important scene as well.

This dream sequence sets the tone for the rest of the movie. As an audience member, we get a feel for how “Edwardes” thinks, feels and acts. Thanks to the creativity and forward thinking of Hitchcock, and the expansive mind of Dali, we were blessed with perhaps the greatest dream sequence ever to be put on the silver screen.

The Best of M-G-M: North by Northwest (1959)

CARY RUNNING NBNW
source: MGM

North by Northwest has always been a strange film for me to watch.

I’ve seen it multiple times, but with each viewing, I can’t shake this nagging feeling of hate I have for a particular character. Of course, this is your typical Hitchcock where there’s a double meaning to everything, but, you’d think that if your son was being falsely accused of something he didn’t do, you would have a little bit more urgency in your step, right?

Right?

Wrong!

The person in question I’m talking about Jessie Royce Landis‘ character, Clara Thornhill.

NBNW JRL
source: MGM

Oh, boy. Where do I begin?

As you may know, NBNW is a story about a man who’s been falsely accused of being a government agent. Roger Thornhill played by Cary Grant, is your average New York City white-collar type of guy. Working in the advertising business, Roger is well versed in the topic of double meanings and false identities.

The story progress and he’s eventually framed for murder. Understandably panicked about the situation, Roger reaches out to anyone the could help with fix the predicament he’s found himself in – including his ‘uncaring’ mother Clara.

Here’s where my problem lies.

It was rather irritating to see her look very nonchalant about this entire ordeal. Even when there was a CLEAR look of panic on her son’s face, she scoffed and brushed him off. I understand this is purely a work of fiction, but it truly annoyed me that a mother would downplay her son’s life or death situation.

JRL NBNW 2
source: MGM

Maybe she was hesitant to believe in something as ‘absurd’ as this, but I don’t think she should’ve excused Roger’s legitimate concerns. Thankfully, she came around, and my complaints may have very well been in vain, but this is something that always stuck with me whenever I watched this film.

Fortunately, Alfred Hitchcock was a master of his craft.

What might’ve looked like a character flaw, could’ve been an important piece of the Hitchcockian puzzle; I suppose I should put aside my grievances and enjoy the movie for what it is: a rather underrated masterpiece in a long list of movies in Hitchcock‘s brilliant filmography.